Rheological properties of fish ball paste by various comminution conditions 

Faculty Mentor: Jae Park
BES site:  Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station, Seafood Lab

Two distinctly different comminution methods are currently used in China. One, is typical comminution using a silent cutter with/without vacuum. The other uses a dough hook to stir the surimi after first grinding with a meat grinder and salt. The resulting texture of cooked fish balls from these two methods is significantly different. Rheological properties of fish proteins is affected by the thermal stability of the fish proteins, which is directly related to the habitat temperature of the fish species. The rheological behavior of fish proteins having different thermal stabilities and extracted from these two different methods could provide critical insight to explain the distinct difference in the resulting gel properties of these cooked fish balls.

Two different species of surimi will be utilized: cold water species, Alaska pollock, and warm water species, Threadfin bream. A fish ball formulation containing: salt (2-3%), sugar (3%), starch (3%), monosodium glutamate MSG (1%), 40% water, and the remainder surimi will be prepared. Paste will be chopped using one of three methods: 1) silent cutter with vacuum; 2) silent a cutter without vacuum; and 3) stirring using a dough hook after grinding with salt. Two different chopping temperatures will be used for both species (5oC and 25oC). A total chopping time of 6, 24, and 30 min using the silent cutter and the dough hook. Accounting for temperature and time variables, a total of 18 batches will prepared. (3 chopping method x 2 species x 3 chopping times).  The entire study will be repeated twice.

Sample pastes will measured for the salt soluble protein extractability and then be cooked by three methods: 1) 90°C water bath for 30 min, 2) 25°C water bathe for 2 hr followed by 90°C water bath for 30 min, and 3) 40°C for 1 hr followed by 90°C water bath for 30 min. After cooking gels will be chilled in ice/water for at least 15 min and then stored overnight in a refrigerator (4-5°C). The following day, gels will be equilibrated to room temperature >2 hr and then evaluated for breaking force (g) and penetration distance (mm) using a TAXT plus Texture Analyzer and color (L*, a*, b*) using a Minolta colorimeter. Sample paste will also be subjected to dynamic rheology analysis using a Bohlin rheometer.

 

Integrative Horticulture

Faculty Mentor: Scott Lukas
BES site:  Hermiston Agricultural Research & Extension Center, Hermiston
Hourly Salary: $14.00    
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
Duration needed: Any
No Housing Benefit
Student will have interaction with minors or access to hazardous chemicals, as student will need to complete a criminal background check.
Student will be operating vehicles or farm equipment/machinery, and student will need to submit a driving background.

The internship will be located at the Oregon State University (OSU) Hermiston Agricultural Research and Extension Center (HAREC) Integrative Horticulture Lab (IHL).  HAREC is located in Hermiston, OR at the center of 450,000 acres of high yielding, irrigated crop land in North central Oregon and South central Washington's Columbia Basin. This is a diverse production area with over 200 cultivated plant species. HAREC contributes value to the local community through research of pressing agricultural issues, and with outreach and engagement.  Specifically, this internship opportunity will be conducting field based research and data collection with the IHL, which focuses on fostering environmental stewardship while maintaining competitive vegetable production outputs.  Research programs are primarily based in the field setting.  The student will acquire knowledge in field production systems, experimental design and data collection in row crops and will work closely with, and report directly to the principal investigator.  The intern may be asked to contribute to scientific writing and informal information dissemination to stakeholders and colleagues.

Job Description
For this project, the student intern is expected to spend 35-40 hours per week split between a field and laboratory setting.  Indoor and outdoor work will be balanced as necessary to facilitate project goals.  Previous experience in topics related to crop production, soil science, nutrient management, weed science, and data collection are desired, but not required.  The student may be asked to assist in data entry and to draw conclusions to interpret results.  This internship is designed to be a learning experience for the student to provide educational diversity to aid in a more informed career / academic path.  The IHL focuses on high value crops such as; blueberry, onion, watermelon, grapes, sweet corn, carrots and more.  Program objectives and research projects are created as a response to industry and stakeholder needs. 

The intern must be able to work independently and as part of a team.  Strong drive to learn and to think creatively are desired.   

 

Functional characterization of genes involved in the response to potato virus Y in potato

Faculty Mentor: Aymeric Goyer
BES site: Hermiston Agricultural Research & Extension Center, Hermiston
Hourly Salary: $13
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week

Potato Virus Y (PVY) is one of the most important pathogens affecting potato production worldwide, and is the most serious problem that the U.S. potato industry is currently facing due to significant yield reduction and loss of quality. Genetic resistance remains the most sustainable approach for combating viral diseases. Therefore, there is a critical need to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that determine plant resistance to PVY. In the absence of such knowledge, it will remain difficult to develop effective, long-term, anti-PVY strategies in the effort to improve safe and reliable potato sources.

My group is trying to unravel the basis of resistance against PVY, from recognition of the viral elicitor to the downstream consequences of recognition in the development of the resistance response. We previously identified five genes that may be essential in the establishment of the resistance against PVY. We hypothesize that these five specific genes are essential in the establishment of the response to PVY.Further investigation is warranted to confirm this hypothesis.

The specific objectives of this project are: 

  1. Design CRISPR/Cas9 DNA constructs for each candidate gene.
  2. Introduce the DNA constructs into the potato genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and regenerate potato plants that carry the DNA constructs.
  3. Use molecular tools to identify regenerated plants with complete knock-out of the gene.
  4. Characterize the response of transformed potato plants upon inoculation with PVY.

For this project, the student intern will be expected to spend 40 hours per week in a laboratory. Laboratory work will consist of using molecular biology and microbiology techniques (e.g. PCR, bacterial culture). In addition, the student will be expected to be responsible of plant care in a greenhouse (i.e. planting in pots, watering, pest control) and of leaf sample collection. Intern must be able to work both independently and as part of a team. Strong organizational and communication skills are required. Basic knowlegde in Word and Excel is desirable.


Oyster aquaculture - probiotics and diseases

Faculty Mentor: Chris Langdon
BES site:  Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station, Newport
Hourly Salary: $12 
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
Culture of larvae requires daily care. There are often others in the program that can take care of animals over the weekends, based on a rotation of weekend duties that is shared among members of the program.
Shared apartments are available at the Hatfield Center and will be covered as part of the internship.

Many species of Vibrio bacteria are pathogenic to bivalve molluscs. Oyster hatcheries, for example, often have unexpected mass mortalities of larvae that result in substantial economic losses and reduced supplies of “seed” for farmers. Our laboratory has been working in conjunction with the laboratory of Dr. Claudia Häse, to develop probiotic bacteria and phages (viruses that attack bacteria) that will control outbreaks of pathogenic Vibrio sp. and avoid the use of antibiotics. 

In this project, the BES student will evaluate different probiotic bacteria and phages to control pathogenic Vibrio bacteria. Probiotic bacteria and phages will be added to cultures of oyster larvae or juvenile oysters (spat) in the presence of pathogenic bacteria and reductions in mortalities determined. An optimal protocol will be developed for the use of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of Vibrio diseases of oyster larvae and spat.

Job Description
The BES intern will be expected to work 40 hrs per week. Some weekend work will be necessary (perhaps 2-3 weekends during the summer) as  there is a need to care for experimental animals; although other folks in the program will take it in turns to work on weekends. The intern will work on his/her own project under the supervision of Dr Chris Langdon alongside a graduate student who is working on the use of phages to control Vibrio pathogens. It is anticipated that the intern will also work on other projects in the aquaculture program at the Hatfield Center and, in this way, the intern will be exposed to a wide range of activities and will learn numerous aquaculture skills and applications.

The intern will be expected to write a report of the project as well as produce a poster to be displayed at the annual College of Agriculture BES and job opportunities meeting in fall term 2017. If the results are interesting, it is possible that they will be included in peer-reviewed publications and that the intern will become a co-author of  these publications and associated presentations.

 

Plant Disease Diagnostics Clinic Internship

Faculty Mentor: Kenneth Frost
BES site: Hermiston Agricultural Research & Extension Center, Hermiston
Hourly Salary: $15  
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
Workload varies depending on daily sample submissions; working outside the hours of 8-5 is sometimes necessary to work through all submissions  
No Housing Benefit
Student will have interaction with minors or access to hazardous chemicals, as student will need to complete a criminal background check.
Student will be operating vehicles or farm equipment/machinery, and student will need to submit a driving background.

This internship is in the plant disease diagnostics clinic located at the Hermiston Agricultural Research & Extension Center (HAREC). HAREC is located in Hermiston, OR at the center of 450,000 acres of high yielding, irrigated crop land in North central Oregon and South central Washington's Columbia Basin. The plant disease diagnostics clinic serves the agricultural region by providing assistance identifying pathogens that cause plant disease and providing educational information about plant diseases and their management to the grower community. The clinic clientele include agricultural producers (e.g., farmers, nursery owners), agricultural professionals (e.g., crop consultants, arborists), home owners/gardeners, Extension staff and Master Gardener volunteers, and state and local government. The student intern will work directly with and report to the plant disease diagnostician at HAREC. The student intern will experience the day-to-day and seasonal activities that occur in the plant diagnostics clinic in a major agricultural area. They will also learn and perform both traditional and molecular techniques that are used to diagnose plant diseases – and use that knowledge to support the testing of plant and insect samples submitted for diagnostic services. In addition to supporting day-to-day plant disease diagnosis, the intern may be asked to develop, with input from the diagnostician and/or principle investigator, a small research project to be completed over the course of the internship. The intern may be asked to assist with the writing of a weekly newsletter and/or present diagnostics data/information to growers in an informal setting as requested by the diagnostician or principle investigator. 

Job Description:
For this project, the student intern will be expected to spend 40 hours per week in an indoor laboratory. Much of the work will involve isolating and identifying fungal, bacterial, and viral plant pathogens. Previous experience with general laboratory equipment, techniques associated with plant pathology, microbiology, and/or molecular biology is desirable. Intern will need to effectively interact and communicate with the clientele of the plant disease diagnostics clinic. Intern must be able to work both independently and as part of a team. Strong organizational and time management skills are desired. Intern may be asked to enter data into spreadsheets, draw conclusions about diagnostics assays, and summarize the significance of lab results.

 

Isolation and identification of tree fruits pathogen in Southern Oregon

Faculty Mentor: Achala KC
BES site: Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center 
Hourly Salary: $15  
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
This project requires travel to research sites or orchards to collect disease samples. Depending on location of travel and workload, the intern is expected to work outside of 8-5. 
No Housing Benefit
Student will have interaction with minors or access to hazardous chemicals, as student will need to complete a criminal background check.
Student will be operating vehicles or farm equipment/machinery, and student will need to submit a driving background.

This internship is available in the Plant Pathology lab at Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center (SOREC) located at Central Point, OR. The region is a major producer of tree fruits (specifically pears) and winegrapes. With increasing acreage under cultivation, the production of fruits and grapes are challenged by various pests and diseases. Both fungal and bacterial diseases threaten the production and marketability of pears; whereas fungi and viruses are major production constraints for winegrapes. The plant pathology program at SOREC is focused on integrated disease management of these crops in Southern Oregon. This includes research on basic and applied plant pathology such as isolation and culture of microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, and viruses; identification of pathogenic microorganisms by using basic morphological and/or advanced molecular techniques; research on the management of identified plant diseases using chemical, biological, or cultural control practices; epidemiology of disease development including disease progress over time, environmental factors affecting disease epidemics, disease spread patterns and dynamics etc. The information collected from these research areas will be combined to develop long term integrated disease management program for particular disease and host.

Job Description
The major objective of this project is to isolate and identify the major pathogens of pear and winegrapes in Southern Oregon and collect the isolates for future studies. For this project, the student intern will be expected to spend 15-20 hours per week outdoors and up to 25 hours per week in an indoor lab. The job requirements include but are not limited to: survey and collect disease samples from local orchards and vineyards or from neighboring counties, process the samples in laboratory for pathogen isolation and culture, identify the pathogen and prepare for long term storage, prepare inventory of stored pathogens, assist in data collection and enter into spreadsheets, assist research assistants or graduate students in their research. With this experiential learning, the intern is expected to learn the basic field and lab techniques of plant pathology, microbiology, and/or molecular biology research; collect, analyze, and interpret data; summarize the results to be used in presentations for growers and scientific meetings.

 Previous experience with laboratory equipment and working knowledge on biology, microbiology, and/or molecular biology are very helpful but not required. The intern is expected to work as a part of team and be able to handle independent project tasks; has strong organizational and management skills; can effectively communicate with other lab members. 

 

Impacts of chaff collection or chaff plus straw collection at harvest to improve weed control

Faculty Mentor: Judit Barroso
BES site:  Columbia Basin Agricultural Research Center, Pendleton
Hourly Salary: $12    
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
Occasionally field work may begin before 8:00am to avoid working during the hottest parts of the day
No Housing Benefit
Student will have interaction with minors or access to hazardous chemicals, as student will need to complete a criminal background check.
Student will be operating vehicles or farm equipment/machinery, and student will need to submit a driving background.

Global wheat production is threatened by the escalating selection of herbicide resistant weed populations. The continuing evolution of herbicide resistance in major crop weeds is a driving force to develop new weed control strategies in field crops and also to preserve the utility of herbicides.

This project will concentrate on the potential benefits of the use of chaff carts and direct bale systems to reduce weed infestations in wheat-production systems in the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Their efficacy to control weeds is unknown because the proportion of weed seed per species collected by the combine and ejected with the chaff or straw has not been investigated.

The intern will assist in field and laboratory work to address the following objectives: 1) Evaluate chaff collection and chaff plus straw collection at harvest to reduce weed species density and dispersion, 2) Evaluate seed production, seed height, and seed retention of important weed species at harvest. 

Job Description
For this project, the intern will be expected to spend 20-30 hours per week outdoors and 10-20 hours per week in an indoor lab. The intern will help to evaluate seed production of different weed species in the PNW region. Also, the intern will help to sample weeds in crop fields to evaluate effectiveness of different harvest practices. An agricultural background is expected and knowledge on weed identification desirable. The intern, as a member of a team, will be expected to help and learn from other activities/projects that the Weed Science Program is developing at CBARC.

Tracking insects abundance, distribution and movement

Faculty Mentor: Silvia I. Rondon
BES site:  Hermiston Agricultural Research & Extension Center, Hermiston
Hourly Salary: $14    
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
The salary covers housing at the HAREC.
Student will be operating vehicles or farm equipment/machinery, as student will need to submit a driving background.

This project aims to train a future entomologist and/or crop production practicioner to set up research experiments in order to evaluate insect abundance, distribution and movement. There are many insect pests that affect irrigated crops in eastern Oregon and the general mission of the Irrigated Agricultural Entomology Program (Rondon program) is to evaluate insect pests that affect irrigated crops to be able to provide information to growers regarding pest outbreaks and to recommend best control methods. The intern will support a graduate student or Posdoctoral scholar by setting and collecting traps in commercial fields. Intern will  be trained in insect identification, collection, and basic data analysis. One of the focus of the intern plan of work will be characterizing Lygus bug and its natural enemies abudance, distribution and movement. Until recently, Lygus bugs were rarely consider pests in the Columbia Basin. Currently, Lygus is thought to cause only minor feeding crop damage, however, our studies have shown that Lygus is able to acquire a phytplasm pathogen called BLTVA and to move BLTVA to healthy plants. This is a applied research proyect that will motivate any student interested in applied science.

Job Description:

For this project, the intern will be expected to spend 20-22 hours per week outdoors and the remaining hours per week in an indoor lab. The program is faily dynamic and my expectation is to have someone that enjoys working with others as part of a team. In general, I have between 8-10 people during the summer and 4-6 full time personnel year around. Creativity and strong ethics are required since long hours of work requiere positive creative strong attitude. The intern will work most of the time with others but driving is necessary (trucks or gators around the farm). As said before, this is a fairly applied work that will introduce the intern to the real agricultural related work. 

Use of non-chemical alternatives to control an important potato pest

Faculty Mentor: Silvia I. Rondon
BES site:  Hermiston Agricultural Research & Extension Center, Hermiston
Hourly Salary: $14    
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
The salary covers housing at the HAREC.
Student will be operating vehicles or farm equipment/machinery, as student will need to submit a driving background.

In general, the mission of the Irrigated Agricultural Entomology Program is to evaluate insect pests that affect irrigated crops. This specific project aims to train a future entomologist and/or crop production practicioner to set up research experiments in order to determine non-chemical alternatives to control an important potato pest. Since 2011, the most important pest affecting potato productivity is the potato psyllid. This insect affect the potato crop by direct feeding and by vectoring a bacteria that causes Zebra Chip disease. This disease is characterized by stripes in the potato flesh reducing quality and yield. The intern will support a graduate student by setting and collecting traps in commercial fields and around fields. Intern will  be trained in potato psyllid and its natural enemies identification, collection, and basic data analysis. The intern will work with the graduate student setting up experiments at the Research Station, where Calcium and other micronutrients will be used as alternative ways to control the pest. This is an applied research proyect that will motivate any student interested in applied science. There will be multiple opportunities to interact with our clientele (field consultants, growers, etc) and to share data collected formally (presentations) or informally (walk-ins).

Job Description:
For this project, the intern will be expected to spend 20-22 hours per week outdoors and the remaining hours per week in an indoor lab. The program is faily dynamic and my expectation is to have someone that enjoys working with others as part of a team. In general, I have between 8-10 people during the summer and 4-6 full time personnel year around. Creativity and strong ethics are required since long hours of work requiere positive creative strong attitude. The intern will work most of the time with others but driving is necessary (trucks or gators around the farm). As said before, this is a fairly applied work that will introduce the intern to the real agricultural related worlk. 

 

Perennial Forage Species/Irrigation Management in Eastern Oregon

Faculty Mentor: Guojie Wang
BES site: Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center, Union Station
Hourly Salary: $12    
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
This project deals with seeding, irrigating, raising, and harvesting forages. These duties will need to be completed in a timely manner. Intern may need to work in the early morning, late afternoon and/or weekends to complete the necessary field work.
Duration needed: Summer 2017 (June to September)
A room in a trailer house, located on site, will be assigned to the intern to use during the internship with no charge to the intern. Intern may/may not share the trailer house with other interns. Necessary cleaning and housekeeping work need to be done on intern’s side. Rooms are available on a first come-first serve basis..
Student will have interaction with minors or access to hazardous chemicals, as student will need to complete a criminal background check.
Student will be operating vehicles or farm equipment/machinery, and student will need to submit a driving background.

The precipitation in June, July, August, and September of eastern Oregon is scarce. Because of this dominant perennial forage species such as bluebunch wheatgrass and Idaho fescue may go into dormancy without adequate irrigation in summer months; thus decreasing yield. The forage demand in summer months is comparable to the need in the spring and fall, if it is not more, creating a forage gap known as “summer depression”. With increasing droughts summer depression of forages will increase globally and in eastern Oregon. In order to overcome the summer depression in forage production, forage and beef producers in eastern Oregon need to develop a production system that conserves water use with higher water use efficiency, and in the same time produce comparable or higher quantity and quality forages. Alternative perennial forage species such as birdsfoot trefoil, cicer milkvetch, wheatgrasses, wildryes, and bromegrasses along with traditional perennial forage species such as alfalfa, tall fescue, and timothy should be evaluated under different irrigation schedules.

The field study will be carried out at the Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center in Union, OR. The project general design is: 1) 20 alternative perennial forage species included; 2) four irrigation schedules including irrigation all season, irrigation until August 1, irrigation until June 15, irrigation until May 1 imposed to those 20 forage species; 3) all the combinations of 20 species and four irrigation schedules replicated four times. The project objective is to study alternative perennial forage species production and quality under different irrigation scenarios. The specific objectives are: 1) Evaluate 20 alternative perennial forage species production and quality; 2) Compare 20 alternative perennial forage species production and quality under different irrigation schedules in eastern Oregon. Those 20 perennial forage species were seeded in 2016. The intern will be responsible for 1) searching each forage species information indoor and writing a literature review about the selected 20 alternative forage species, 2) managing forage plots including pest control, irrigation, and fertilization, 3) monitoring forage plots including species developmental stages, height, density, and production, 4) inputting and analyzing the collected data, and 6) interpreting results and making a poster. 

The leaning objective of this internship is to 1) have hands-on opportunities in agriculture related activities, such as field measurement, seeding, fertilization, weed control, and irrigation; 2) have scientific training such as experimental design, data collection, field monitoring, and results interpretation; 3) interact with local producers and scientists and have a broader perspective on agriculture production through field tours and producers’ meetings. The expectations to the intern from project mentor is to 1) communicate with mentor, summer tech, graduate student, and other personnel effectively and work together efficiently; 2) perform the necessary daily tasks the mentor responsible for smoothly with help from mentor and other personnel; 3) meet deadlines for this internship program midterm report and final poster presentation; 4) learn new scientific and practical knowledge daily and avtively by asking questions, searching internets, and other means. 

Job Description
The job will consist of fieldwork and data processing conducted on forage research trials at the EOARC in Union, OR. This will be accomplished by, but not excluded to:

  • Assisting the forage agronomist and other personnel
  • Seeding forage plots
  • Mowing forage plot alleys
  • Maintaining forage plots through weed control, both through herbicide application and hand weeding
  • Fertilizing forage plots
  • Monitoring forage plots
  • Collecting forage and soil samples
  • Inputting data into a computer software
  • Repairing and maintaining facilities and equipment
  • Operating and installing irrigation systems (hand lines)
  • Operation of farm equipment and machinery
  • Interact with and help graduate student

Key skills that should be brought to this internship are the ability to pay close attention to detail; tolerance of repetitive work; mature and responsible with the ability to work independently or in a group; interest in agronomic practices.  A driver license is required for this internship.

For this project, the student intern will be expected to spend 25-35 hours per week outdoors and up to 15 hours per week in an indoor lab that depending on the time of the season, these hours can vary widely. On the job training will occur for needed tasks. Previous experience with a manual shift vehicle is preferred.

 

Enhancing Seafood Quality and Utilization

Faculty Mentor: Christina DeWitt
BES site: Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station, Astoria
Hourly Salary: $12   
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
Duration needed: Summer 2017, No later than July 1 start, no earlier than Sept 8 end.
Activities might involve shelf-life studies which run 7 days a week.  Analystical evaluations may sometimes require students stay or come in after hours to complete them. Students need to be flexible and willing to work after hours and weekends when needed.   
No Housing Benefit
Student will be operating vehicles or farm equipment/machinery, and student will need to submit a driving background.
Student will have interaction with minors or access to hazardous chemicals, as student will need to complete a criminal background check.

An undergraduate internship is available for summer 2017 at the OSU Seafood Laboratory in Astoria, OR.  As an intern you will be assisting in research focused on improving quality and safety of seafood.  This experience will involve the intern in ongoing projects involving shelf-life studies, brine injection, nutritional evaluation, depuration or hydrostatic high pressure of seafood. 

Currently, ongoing projects include studies that:

  1. Evaluate the impact of brine ingredients on the quality and safety of seafood products.  This project understanding how to formulate and deliver marinades using multineedle injector technology to improve fish fillet quality, shelf-life and safety. 
  2. Evaluate the ability of bioimpedance technology to determine decomposition, temperature abuse and composition of seafood products.  Bioimpedance is a technology utilized in the medical industry to measure body composition.  This project involves adapting this technology for collection of fish quality and compositional information.  Current efforts are to understand the relationship between decomposition and instrumental readings for the major commercial species.  In addition, work is also focused on understanding how the instrument could be utilized to collect compositional data, such as fat content in different species.
  3. Evaluate the nutritional composition of seafood products and their by-products.  This project is focused on understanding how harvest time effects the nutritional composition of pollock fillets, roe and milt.  Analysis could include fatty acids, amino acid, mineral or nucleic acid.
  4. Evaluate the ability of high pressure low temperature processing to enhance safety and without detrimentally impacting product quality of seafood products.  This project is focused on the application of high pressure processing on frozen products to cause ice phase changes that disrupt microorganisms and enhance the shelf-life and safety of ready-to-eat seafood.
  5. Maintenance/Update of the Seafood Network Information Center (seafood.oregonstate.edu).  This project involves insuring the content on the Seafood Network Information Center is up to date.  Web skills are not necessary, they can be taught.
  6. Reduce pathogens such as Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Oysters.  This project focuses on how flow rates during depuration of oysters can impact the retention of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a pathogen that causes illness as a result of consuming raw oysters.

Job Description:

The ideal candidate will have an interest in learning chemical and microbiological techniques used to evaluate seafood.  For this project, the student intern will be expected to spend most of their time either in the laboratory or pilot plant at the OSU Seafood Laboratory in Astoria.  Students will also be expected to be able to drive the laboratory vehicles as sometimes samples or supplies have to be picked-up at processing plants. 

Activities will be dependent on the successful candidate’s skill level.  The student will be expected to be involved in all phases of project work.  This includes, sample preparation for analysis, data analysis, data entry, data evaluation, and report writing.  Previous experience with chemical analysis, biochemical techniques, microbial techniques is a definite plus, but not required.  Excel experience is also a plus.  Any website design experience is also a plus.  Work may involve driving laboratory vehicles to collect fish from processing facilities and subsequent processing of the fish (i.e. filleting).  It could also involve operation of processing equipment.  In addition, the intern will be involved in learning techniques used to evaluate quality and safety of seafood products.  Potential techniques interns may have the opportunity to assist with include, but are not limited to, odor and visual sensory evaluation of fish, microbial evaluation (aerobic plate counts, Vibrio spp), fish freshness by K-value (High Pressure Liquid Chromatography), measurement of lipid oxidation, color measurement, nutritional and compositional evaluations and water phase salt evaluations of smoked salmon, depuration of oysters.  When not working in the lab, student may be asked to help with updating website materials for the Seafood Network Information Center.

 

Diseases of Carrot Seed and Other Specialty Crops in Central Oregon

Faculty Mentor: Jeremiah Dung
BES site: Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center, Madras
Hourly Salary: $15    
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
Work hours may vary depending on crop maturity, weather, grower schedules, or other factors that cannot be controlled.
Duration needed: Summer 2017 
No Housing Benefit.
Student will be operating vehicles or farm equipment/machinery, and student will need to submit a driving background.
Student will have interaction with minors or access to hazardous chemicals, as student will need to complete a criminal background check.

High value specialty crops are a major component of agriculture in central Oregon. The area is a major producer of carrot seed, supplying over 80% of the hybrid carrot seed planted in the U.S. Central Oregon also produces Kentucky bluegrass seed, peppermint for oil and tea leaf, garlic and onion seed, wheat, seed potatoes, and alfalfa hay and seed. Pests and diseases present a significant challenge to crop production by reducing yields, increasing costs of production, and limiting market acceptability.

The Plant Pathology Lab at the Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center (COARC) is focused on the study and control of plant diseases affecting the high-value specialty crops of the region. We use both traditional and molecular techniques to answer applied and basic questions related to the biology and control of plant pathogens, with the goal of developing integrated disease management programs for long-term, sustainable control. Specific research focuses on pathogen detection and quantification, population genetics of plant pathogens, spatial and temporal dynamics of plant disease, and identifying environmental factors that contribute to plant disease epidemics. 

The intern working on this COARC Branch Experiment Station (BES) Experiential Learning Experience will have the opportunity to be involved one or more research projects. Specific research projects will depend on the intern’s interests, academic and career goals, funding availability, and project needs. Research projects planned for 2017 include, but are not limited to, characterizing genetic markers for mating type in the Verticillium fungus that causes wilt in mint, disease modeling and prediction in Kentucky bluegrass seed production, and identifying novel controls for bacterial blight in carrot seed crops.

Depending on the project, the intern will gain skills related to experimental design, field research (survey and sampling protocols, small plot research), microbiology (aseptic technique and culturing of fungi and/or bacteria), molecular biology (DNA extraction, PCR, gel electrophoresis, quantitative-PCR), and basic plant pathology techniques (inoculating plants, determining disease incidence and severity, soil sampling, and isolating plant pathogens from infected tissues). The intern will learn methods associated with data collection, basic data analyses, and summarizing research results for diverse audiences including growers, industry stakeholders, and the scientific community.

Job Description:
This COARC BES Experiential Learning Experience will require the intern to work in laboratory, greenhouse and field conditions and with basic computer software (Word, Excel, and PowerPoint). Although not required, a background in biology, microbiology, molecular biology, and/or plant pathology (either courses or prior lab experience) would be advantageous for this experiential learning experience. 

 

Specialty Crop Block Grant Crop Up Series

Faculty Mentor: Sarah Masoni and Jason Ball
BES site: Food Innovation Center, Portland
Hourly Salary: $14.50     
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
Duration needed: June through September 2017
Student may be asked to work on weekends or outside of 8-5. Service depends upon support needed, travel and weekends may be required.
No Housing Benefit

For this project the student intern will be working with the research chef, and the product development manager to assist with day to day projects in and around the Food Innovation Center.  Project will mainly be focused on executing the Specialty Crop Block Grant Crop-up series that travels around the Oregon putting on Pop-Up Style meals for crowds up to 120 people, a farmers market, and educational information for attendees.  Student intern will collect data, analyze data, and work on the cook book and photograph document for the grant.

Time will be spent in the kitchen preparing food, cleaning, chopping, cooking.  Set-up, service and breakdown.  Travel will be part of this project, 5 locations will be visited during the summer internship.

  1. Salem, OR
  2. Boardman, OR
  3. Eugene, OR
  4. Portland, OR
  5. Bend, OR

Job Description
For this project, the student intern will be expected to spend 40  hours per week in an indoor lab, kitchen and work at a desk.  When traveling is required, to on site locations for the Crop-ups, student intern will be expected to lift up to 50 pounds and move small equipment around, as well as work outside rain or shine.  Student will be staying in hotels and working in rural Oregon with the team.  Travel expenses will be reimbursed for Crop-up events. 

Student must be interested in a culinary experience, and have experience working in a lab to test for pH, water activity, and brix.  Student must be experienced with Microsoft and be able to collect data, analyze data, create powerpoints, and have an general interest in developing marketing materials such as a cook book.

 

Smart Food Safety Traceability Information System

Faculty Mentor: Doretta Claycomb
BES site: Food Innovation Center, Portland
Hourly Salary: $15    
Expected hours/week: 35-40 hr/week
Duration needed: Summer 2017
No Housing Benefit

The OSU Food Innovation Center is located in the Pearl District in Portland Oregon. This Agricultural Experiment Station is devoted to assisting the food industry and entrepreneurs to bring value-added food products to market, along with applied research, and food safety.

The main objective of this internship (70%) is to develop a smartphone based traceability application for small food producers to manage their production inventory and food safety recall using a mobile technology solution platform, TracerPlus. Specific objectives include:

  1. Understanding production inventory of small food producers;
  2. Identify traceability information needs for small producers;
  3. Identify required tools for converting existing paper based inventory records to digital records;
  4. Develop smart phone (I-phone and Android) based traceability application with proper user interface based on TracerPlus platform;
  5. Validate the application by working with three different small food producers.  

Another aspect of this internship (30%) would support food product testing for basic food quality analysis such as: pH, water activity, Brix, headspace package analysis, color- spectrophotometer measurements, etc. These types of testing allows the staff to better understand the attributes of the food so that further assistance can be shared with the client in areas of product development, shelf life studies, and food safety. The intern would also be involved in setting up and evaluating quality attributes for sensory evaluation for client based shelf life studies. At the end of the internship, the student will give a presentation of their projects to FIC staff and invited guests. 

Job Description
To be minimally qualified for this internship, the student should have completed the following courses at the end of the 2017 Spring Term:

  • Fruit & Vegetable Processing (FST 210)
  • Introduction of Food Engineering (BEE 472-473)
  • Quantitative Analysis (CH324)
  • Food Packaging (FST 495)

Preferred skill may include but not limited to, Excel Spreadsheet, PowerPoint Presentation, Publisher, and willing to learn application software and be comfortable with smart phone application.  

If you enjoy working around innovative food technologies and a collaborative team, please consider this internship position.

 

Sensory and Consumer Testing Internship at the Food Innovation Center

Faculty Mentor: Ann Colonna
BES site: Food Innovation Center, Portland
Hourly Salary: $15    
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
Duration needed: Summer & Fall 2017, Winter & Spring 2018. As long as the student is interested.
Occasionally we may run weekday evening focus groups or weekend taste tests at farmers markets or food festivals.
No Housing Benefit

The Sensory intern will be assisting the Sensory Program Manager, Sensory Specialist and other Sensory Program Staff with all aspects of sensory testing.  Duties will include: meeting with clients to discuss overall testing objectives, putting together a budget and formal proposal, building screeners in Qualtrics, performing a full category review with the sensory team and client, emailing and calling for the recruitment of consumers from an existing database using Microsoft Access and Microsoft Outlook, advertising through Craigslist and other sites, preparing the test ballot in the data acquisition system Compusense, potentially working with the Institutional Review Board on consent forms, preparing the test design and serving order, printing labels, making copies, the coding of serving materials, food sample preparation, serving food samples to consumers and clean up of the sensory reception facilities post test, analyzing testing results and preparing a full report for the client. Consumer tests are conducted both at the FIC laboratory complex in Portland and off-site. The laboratory complex includes a reception area, 10 booths and a staging area, a descriptive analysis/focus room, observation area and a commercial kitchen. The student intern will gain excellent real world, hands on skills in dealing with clients and administering sensory tests from beginning to end.  Students will be responsible for reporting these results to FIC staff upon completion of their internship.

Most work will be done at the FIC sensory lab, but occasionally we may go offsite to other venues for client work.

 

Sensory and Consumer Research/Testing

Faculty Mentor: Aimee Hasenbeck
BES site: Food Innovation Center, Portland
Hourly Salary: $15    
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
Duration needed: Summer & Fall 2017, Winter & Spring 2018. As long as the student is interested.
Occasionally we may run weekday evening focus groups or weekend taste tests at farmers markets or food festivals.
No Housing Benefit

The Sensory intern will be assisting the Sensory Program Manager, Sensory Specialist and other Sensory Program Staff with all aspects of sensory testing.  Duties will include: meeting with clients to discuss overall testing objectives, putting together a budget and formal proposal, building screeners in Qualtrics, performing a full category review with the sensory team and client, emailing and calling for the recruitment of consumers from an existing database using Microsoft Access and Microsoft Outlook, advertising through Craigslist and other sites, preparing the test ballot in the data acquisition system Compusense, potentially working with the Institutional Review Board on consent forms, preparing the test design and serving order, printing labels, making copies, the coding of serving materials, food sample preparation, serving food samples to consumers and clean up of the sensory reception facilities post test, analyzing testing results and preparing a full report for the client. Consumer tests are conducted both at the FIC laboratory complex in Portland and off-site. The laboratory complex includes a reception area, 10 booths and a staging area, a descriptive analysis/focus room, observation area and a commercial kitchen. The student intern will gain excellent real world, hands on skills in dealing with clients and administering sensory tests from beginning to end.  Students will be responsible for reporting these results to FIC staff upon completion of their internship.

Most work will be done at the FIC sensory lab, but occasionally we may go offsite to other venues for client work.

Greater sage-grouse habitat suitability and management on historical crested wheatgrass seedings in southeastern Oregon

Faculty Mentor: Lesley Morris
BES site: Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center, Union Station
Hourly Salary: $12    
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
Student may be asked to work 4 ten hour days.
Duration needed: Summer 2017 
No Housing Benefit, but we can assist in finding housing if needed.
Student will be operating vehicles or farm equipment/machinery, and student will need to submit a driving background.

Historically, millions of acres of rangeland dominated by Wyoming big sagebrush were cleared of native vegetation, disc-plowed, and seeded with introduced perennial grasses to increase forage production for livestock. These seeded areas included abandoned dry-land farms and sagebrush rangeland on both private and public land. Crested wheatgrass was one of the most commonly seeded forage species in the western United States, and is now widespread throughout western rangelands. The current condition of these historically seeded rangelands, particularly the re-establishment of sagebrush within them, has recently taken on special importance in the West because of the role sagebrush and its understory plants play in the habitat and diet of the greater sage-grouse. These previously seeded rangelands are also an increasingly important part of the sage-grouse habitat due to recent loss of sagebrush communities in large rangeland fires over the past several years. Understanding which areas are likely to return to shrub communities on their own, and which may need additional intervention, is critical for multiple-use management of these rangelands.

 This internship will be centered on collecting vegetation data from historically seeded rangelands in southeastern and eastern Oregon. Information regarding these questions is important to a large number of stakeholder groups including management agencies, livestock producers, and wildlife enthusiasts. Guided by the advisor, this intern will be responsible for field data collection and mapping. The student will also participate with the advisor and project collaborators in data analysis and, potentially, co-authoring a paper. 

Job Description
Students with an interest in range management, natural resources, wildlife management, conservation or environmental studies are encouraged to apply. Some background in plant identification and GIS is preferred, but not required. The intern will receive the necessary training to complete field components of job. The work will require traveling, camping, lifting, standing and walking outdoors for extended times. The position does require a driver’s license. This internship is offered at $12 hour and housing may be available if needed.

Restoration and Management of Wildland Ecosystems to Support Sustained Production of Culturally Important Plant Resources

Faculty Mentor: Bryan Endress
BES site: Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center, Union Station
Hourly Salary: $12    
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
Student may be asked to work 4 ten hour days.
Duration needed: Summer 2017 
No Housing Benefit, but we can assist in finding housing if needed.
Student will be operating vehicles or farm equipment/machinery, and student will need to submit a driving background.

First Foods have sustained tribal people since time immemorial and the relationship between First Foods and the Tribes is essential to the ongoing culture of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The First Foods are - Water, Salmon, Deer, Cous, and Huckleberry. Each First Food represents a grouping of similar species - Salmon represent aquatic life forms (e.g. steelhead, lamprey, freshwater mussels, and various resident fish); Deer represent big game (e.g. mule deer, elk, bighorn sheep, etc.), Cous represents plant foods that are dug (e.g. biscuitroot, camas, bitterroot); Huckleberry represents plant foods that are picked (e.g. huckleberry, chokecherry, golden currant). The First Foods serve a fundamental role in the health, well-being, and cultural identity of the Tribes, and are considered by CTUIR Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to constitute the minimum ecological products necessary to sustain subsistence and cultural needs. As a result, DNR adopted the following mission based on First Foods:

 “To protect, restore, and enhance the First Foods - water, salmon, deer, cous, and huckleberry - for the perpetual cultural, economic, and sovereign benefit of the CTUIR. We will accomplish this utilizing traditional ecological and cultural knowledge and science to inform: 1) population and habitat management goals and actions; and 2) natural resource policies and regulatory mechanisms.”

Recently, CTUIR purchased the 545 acre Southern Cross ranch outside of Union, Oregon.  They are currently in the process of developing a management and habitat restoration plan for this property, which contains a mix of agricultural, riparian, grassland, and shrubland ecosystems.  Their goal is to develop a plan that supports healthy and productive ecosystems that support First Food resources.

This internship will be centered on collecting and gathering information that will be used to inform restoration and management plans that currently being developed.  Specifically, the internship will focus on: (1) collecting and synthesizing ecological, environmental and land use history for the property, (2) document presence and abundance of key First Food resources, (3) identify and map invasive plant infestations and (4) assist with assessments of key ecological attributes (vegetation composition and structure, physical site attributes, etc.) on Southern Cross. Information will then be utilized to inform the restoration and management plan for Southern Cross.  This will also serve as a model for other areas within the 6.4 million acres of land CTUIR ceded to the US government.  This is a collaborative position and the intern will work closely with both Dr. Endress and CTUIR staff.  Training, mentoring, and guiding will be provided throughout the summer. 

The student will gain experience in botany, field collection of plant community monitoring data collection, plant resource management, data collection with GPS, methods of assessing ecosystem health, how to interpret data and apply it to restoration and management.  The potential for a publication based on this work is high.  

Job Description
Students with an interest in ecology, natural resources, wildland restoration, management of culturally-important resources, or environmental studies are encouraged to apply. Background in plant identification and vegetation sampling is preferred, but not required. Experience with GPS, GIS and/or website design a plus. The ability to work in a group and independently is required.  The work will require traveling, hiking standing and working in challenge terrain. The position does require a driver’s license. This internship is offered at $12 hour and housing may be available if needed. 

 

Monitoring the impact and spread of a new invasive annual grass (Ventenata dubia) in Oregon

Faculty Mentor: Lesley Morris and Bryan Endress
BES site: Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center, Union Station
Hourly Salary: $12    
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
Student may be asked to work 4 ten hour days.
Duration needed: Summer 2017 
No Housing Benefit, but we can assist in finding housing if needed.
Student will be operating vehicles or farm equipment/machinery, and student will need to submit a driving background.

Venenata (Ventenata dubia) is a relatively new invasive annual grass to rangelands in the Pacific Northwest, including Oregon. Although its spread has been rapid in the last decade, very little is actually known about the conditions that enable it to increase or how this invasive species will affect rangelands in Oregon.

This internship will be centered on assisting in research that addresses two major questions about ventenata on rangelands: 1) what environmental factors either enable or inhibit the spread of ventenata (e.g., fire, soils, plant community types) and 2) how does ventenata affect native plant species and soils of rangeland where it has invaded? Information regarding these questions is important to a large number of stakeholder groups including management agencies, livestock producers, and wildlife enthusiasts.

The intern for this project will participate in two projects, one in the field and one in the greenhouse. The fieldwork will take place primarily on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve in northeastern Oregon. This fieldwork includes monitoring the vegetation one year after a prescribed burn. The student will gain experience in botany, field collection of plant community monitoring data collection, database management, experimental design, green house methods, data analysis, and how to interpret research data and apply it to management and, potentially publication. Guided by advisors, this intern will be responsible for the initial set-up and maintenance of the green house experiment, watering, measuring over the course of the experiment, and harvesting. The student will also participate with advisors in data analysis and, potentially, which could lead to co-authoring a paper.

Job Description
Students with an interest in range management, natural resources, invasive species, or environmental studies are encouraged to apply. Some background in plant identification is preferred, but not required. The intern will receive the necessary training to complete field and greenhouse components of job. The work will require traveling, camping, lifting, standing and walking outdoors for extended times. The position does require a driver’s license. This internship is offered at $12 hour and housing may be available if needed.

 

Efficacy of traditional and non-traditional eco-friendly “green” sanitizers on Listeria monocytogenes strains recovered from diverse food production environments.

Faculty Mentor: Jovana Kovacevic
BES site: Food Innovation Center, Portland
Hourly Salary: $14.50     
Expected hours/week: 25-35 h/week
Duration needed: Summer 2017 and Fall 2017, Can be up to 20 weeks, starting in Summer 2017.
Student may be asked to work on weekends or outside of 8-5
No Housing Benefit

The project that the student will participate in will investigate the effectiveness of traditional chemical sanitizers and non-traditional “green” and organic sanitizers applied at different temperatures, against diverse Listeria microorganisms.  

Specific objectives include:

  1. Determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of three traditional chemical sanitizers and three non-traditional green and organic sanitizers against 15 L. monocytogenes strainsrecovered from various food production environments in the Pacific Northwest (PNW), when strains are grown in liquid cultures and exposed to treatments at temperatures ranging from 4 to 30°C.
  2. Assess the efficacy of three traditional chemical sanitizers and three non-traditional sanitizers used in organic operations, or “green” sanitizer compounds against L. monocytogenes strains (n=5) with highest MICs, when strains are grown on: (i) stainless steel coupons, (ii) wooden coupons, (iii) glass, and (iv) plastic surfaces and exposed to manufacturer recommended sanitizer concentrations at temperatures ranging from 4 to 30°C. 
  3. Evaluate growth rates of L. monocytogenes (n=15) in the presence of sub-lethal concentrations of sanitizers, to mimic potential inadequate sanitation practices that may occur in food production environments. 

The findings will be used to make recommendations for growers and food processors regarding sanitizer efficacies, in order to help improve Listeria spp. control in food production environments in PNW. This project will also provide preliminary data for future research that will utilize comparative genotypic approaches to elucidate mechanisms contributing to sanitizer resistance, and potential relationship between sanitizer and antibiotics resistance.

Job Description
For this project, the student intern will be expected to spend 25 to 35 h per week in an indoor food microbiology laboratory. The student intern will receive training required to work in a biosafety level 1 and 2 microbiology labroatories, and will be expected to handle potentially pathogenic microorganisms, such as Listeria monocytogenes. The student intern will also be involved in developing and updating standard operating procedures (SOPs), and writing of abstracts/posters for participation in seminars and/or conferences. At the end of the internship, the student will give a presentation of their project to FIC staff and invited guests. 

Prerequisite skills: Previous microbiology laboratory experience and application of aseptic techniques is required.  Advanced writing skills are desirable.

 

Machine harvesting fresh quality blueberries

Faculty Mentor: Wei Qiang Yang
BES site:  North Willamette Research and Extension Center, Aurora
Hourly Salary: $13.50    
Expected hours/week: 40 hr/week
Duration needed: Summer 2017
No Housing Benefit
Student will be operating vehicles or farm equipment/machinery, as student will need to submit a driving background.

The blueberry machine harvest project will work with a modified commerical blueberry harvester to test the fresh quality of blueberries picked by this new machine.  This is a Specialty Crops Research Initiative (SCRI) funded program to develop a next generation machine harvester for fresh market blueberries. Our team of scientists include engineers from the USDA and the University of Georgia who help configure the new harvester and enable us to tes it in commercial blueberry fields. 

Mechanically harvesting blueberries is not new to growers. The over-the-row (OTR) harvester has been used to harvest blueberries since the early 1960’s. Compared to hand picking, OTR harvesting has two major limitations for harvesting fresh quality blueberries. The first is the significant ground losses resulting from the inability of catch plates to close tightly around the base of blueberry plants, which is still an engineering challenge in today’s modern OTR harvesters. The second limitation is bruising damage to fruits caused by long distances fruits fall and travel on conveyer belts to the beer flats. In follow up studies, more decay in mechanically harvested berries as compared to hand-harvested fruits was observed in both highbush and rabbiteye blueberries. Recently, a hand-held hook shaker was tested for harvesting fresh quality blueberries in Chile (Jorge Retamales, personal communication). In 2015 and 2016, we field-tested a pneumatic Campagnola ‘Golia’ olive shaker to mechanically harvest four blueberry cultivars (‘Draper’, ‘Liberty’, ‘Legacy’, and ‘Aurora’) in commercial fields. The results demonstrated that fruit qualities such as firmness and internal bruising did not differ between fruits harvested with a hand-held ‘Golia’ olive shaker and those harvested by hand. Operating air pressure (65 psi vs. 45 psi) did not affect total yield, or the percent of green and red fruits. By mounting a larger ‘Golia’ pneumatic shaker to a harvester frame, we were able to improve picking efficiency compared with hand harvest. This project will use these ‘Golia’ shakers installed in an Oxbo commercial blueberry harvester with a modified catch surface to harvester blueberries for the fresh market. Fresh quality of berries will be tested postharvest for storage quality and other traits.

Job Description
The student intern is expected to work in commercial blueberry fields 10-16 hours per week to help take fruit samples and 10-16 hours in the lab for fruit quality testing. Because the experiments will be in grower’s field, it’s expected the student intern will drive to the field alone to perform required work. Some greenhouse work from 10-16 hours per week will be expected as well to take care of blueberry plants for supporting the machine harvester project. Ability to operate pH meters is expected

 

Smart Phone Based Food Safety Traceability Solution

Faculty Mentor: Qingyue Ling
BES site: Food Innovation Center, Portland
Hourly Salary: $15    
Expected hours/week: 35-40 hr/week
Duration needed: mid-June through mid-September 2017
Student may be asked to work on weekends or outside of 8-5. Service depends upon support needed, travel and weekends may be required.
No Housing Benefit

The main objective of this internship (90%) is to develop a smartphone based traceability application for small food producers to manage their production inventory and food safety recall using a mobile technology solution platform, TracerPlus. Specific objectives include:

  1. Work with FICES FTS Intern I student to acquire the needed food production inventory information
  2. Identify and acquire the needed tools (devices and software) for converting existing paper based inventory records to digital records;
  3. Develop smart phone (I-phone and Android) based traceability application with proper user interface based on TracerPlus platform;
  4. Validate the application by working with three different small food producers.  

Another aspect of this internship (10%) would support food product testing for basic food quality analysis such as: pH, water activity, Brix, headspace package analysis, color- spectrophotometer measurements, etc.

At the end of the internship, the student will give a presentation of their project to FICES and Department of EECS staff and invited guests. 

Job Description
To be minimally qualified for this internship, the student should have completed the following courses at the end of the 2017 Spring Term:

  1. Sophomore or junior standing in computer science or electrical engineering
  2. Data structure (OSU CS261) or equivalent
  3. Strong knowledge in Java

 For this internship, the intern is expected to work 35 to 40 hours per week with hourly rate of $15 from mid-June through mid-September. The student, Intern II will work in collaboration with another student, Intern I to complete the assigned projects. This may require the intern to travel to FICES at Portland, OR bi-weekly to communicate and work with Intern I to acquire the needed information for application development work

Preferred skill may include but not limited to (list of programing skills): experience with Android or iPhone app development, software engineering courses (OSU CS 361 and CS 362 or equivalent),  and willing to learn new application software and be comfortable with smart phone application.  If you enjoy working around innovative food and engineering technologies and a collaborative team, please consider this internship position.

 

Fingerprinting of Umatilla Potato Samples from Seed Lot Trials Using Simple Sequence Repeat Markers

Faculty Mentor: Vidyasagar Sathuvalli Rajakalyan
BES site:  Hermiston Agricultural Research & Extension Center, Hermiston
Hourly Salary: $12/hr    
Expected hours/week: 25-40 
Duration needed: Summer 2017
Student will be given an opportunity to stay at the Station Graduate student Housing.
Student will be operating vehicles or farm equipment/machinery, and student will need to submit a driving background.

Umatilla Potato is one of the major potato growing varieties in the Northwest mainly aimed at Processing industry. Umatilla cultivar was released by Oregon State University through the Tri-State Potato Vareity Development Program. In 2016 we fingerprinted few Umatilla Samples for their true to type to the original Umatilla cultivar and found that few of the samples did not match to the original genotype we are mainting. This project aims at studying the presence of Umatilla off-types in our region.

We plan on collecting 8 random samples from each seedlot trial grown at Hermiston, OR and Othello, WA. Plan is collect samples from 12 to 24 seedlots for a total of 96 to 192 samples. DNA will be extracted from these samples and will be genotyped using eight simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers using the protocol previously described by Bali et al. (2016). The control for this study will include tissue culture Umatilla samples from our program and also from the Univeristy of Idaho’s Potato tissue culture lab. Upon gel electrophoresis, the samples will be analyzed for their true to type to Umatilla.

Expected outcomes:

We expect all the samples to be true to type to Umatilla. If the samples are found to be off-type we plan on dessiminating the information to the growers, seed certification agencies and the industry during the Hermiston Farm Fair.

Job Description
Student is expected to collect leaf samples from the seed lot trials, extract DNA and perform PCR and gel electrophoresis. A record has to be maintained during the project and all the gel images needs to be pasted in the lab note book. It is expected that the student needs to help with greenhouse and field activities to learn various potato breeding activites. 

 

Croptime: degree-day modeling

Faculty Mentor: Nick Andrews
BES site:  North Willamette Research and Extension Center, Aurora
Hourly Salary: $13    
Expected hours/week: 30-40 in summer
Duration needed: Summer 2017
No Housing Benefit
I can work with students in Eugene, Corvallis or Aurora

The Croptime project aims to develop degree-day (DD) models for vegetable varieties and weed species. DD models use time and temperature to provide more accurate predictions of plant development than time alone. Currently vegetable growers rely on the ‘days to maturity’ information in seed catalogs to estimate time to maturity. Growth and development of plants and other ecto-thermic (i.e. “cold-blooded”) organisms varies significantly. We all notice plants growing quickly when it is warm and slowly when it is cold. Calendar days alone often provide inaccurate predictions of maturity dates.

Vegetable variety DD models in tandem with the extensive networks of automatic weather stations can be used to help growers schedule planting dates and predict harvest dates to ensure even supply during the season that matches market demands, and help them avoid gluts and shortages. The weed models help growers predict when a weed that is emerging in their field is likely to set seed. After a crop is well established weeds often don’t directly compete with the crop and reduce yield. However, if the weeds are allowed to set viable seed, they will rapidly increase the weed seed bank. This late season weed control can often be expensive (i.e. hand weeding crews), so these models attempt to guide growers labor management decisions.

During this part of the project we will be focusing on final development of the vegetable models. You can learn more about the project and try using the models we already have online at the project website: http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/croptime. The home page describes the project and has an instructional video that explains how to use the Croptime calculator where the models are hosted. 

 

Aquatic Invertebrates in Eastern Oregon

Faculty Mentor: David Wooster
BES site:  Hermiston Agricultural Research & Extension Center 
Hourly Salary: $15    
Expected hours/week: 40 hours
Duration needed: Summer 2017, 10 weeks
No Housing Benefit
The intern will not be asked to work more than 8 hours a day or 40 hours a week. However, the intern must be willing to occasionally work later than 5pm.

The intern involved in this project would be engaged in research focused on aquatic invertebrates in streams and rivers found in the agroecosystems of eastern Oregon. Aquatic invertebrates (i.e., animals without backbones) play important ecological roles in all ecosystems including streams, including predation, decomposition, food web provisioning, and nutrient cycling.  The intern involved in this research project would assist in a variety of invertebrate related research projects important to agricultural and natural resource stakeholders in eastern Oregon.  Objectives of these studies include:

  1. examining the ability of predatory aquatic insects to control mosquito larvae and factors influencing that control;
  2. investigating the dynamics of the spread of an exotic invasive aquatic species, the rusty crayfish, and the native species it is potentially replacing, the signal crayfish, and
  3. examining the use of aquatic invertebrates in monitoring the condition of river and stream reaches

The student will work both in the laboratory and the field. Laboratory work involves laboratory experiments, sorting, counting, and identifying aquatic invertebrates, maintaining invertebrate collections, data entry, and lab equipment maintenance. Field work involves sampling invertebrates and environmental attributes in fast-flowing streams, riparian areas, and agricultural fields.

Job Description:
The internship will involve both field and laboratory work. Field work can be all day (up to 8 hours) and involve physical activity such as walking to field sites while carrying up to 15 pounds of equipment, sweep netting for aquatic insects in ponds, and wading in rivers. It is anticipated ~30% of the intern’s time will be spent in the field. Laboratory work will include both conducting lab experiments and learning to identify and measure aquatic invertebrates using dichotomous keys, stereomicroscopes, and calipers. Laboratory work will also involve data entry using a desk top computer and the program Excel.

 

Pollination Ecology in Riparian Areas and Grasslands

Faculty Mentor: Sandra J. DeBano
BES site:  Hermiston Agricultural Research & Extension Center 
Hourly Salary: $15    
Expected hours/week: 40 hours
Duration needed: Summer 2017
No Housing Benefit
Student may be asked to work on weekends or outside of 8-5. Field work may begin earlier than 8 AM or last later than 5 PM on some days.

The intern involved in this project will be engaged in research focused on understanding how management and restoration of riparian areas and other habitats may enhance an important group of pollinators: native bees. Native bees are a diverse group of insects that provide pollination services that many crops and wild plants rely on. With the decline of European honeybees, the role of native bees in agricultural systems has become even more significant. This research project serves our local stakeholders (e.g., agricultural producers, natural resource managers) by identifying ways to increase pollination services through restoration of uncultivated areas located in forests and agroecosystems.  The intern will assist in field and laboratory work to address the following objectives:

  1. quantify the diversity and abundance of native bees in restored riparian areas and grasslands in eastern Oregon;
  2. describe how plant communities in each area influence the type and number of native bees present in those areas; and
  3. document plant-native bee relationships in each area.

Although no previous entomological training is necessary, the student is expected to be physically capable of working in challenging summer field conditions as well as in the laboratory preparing collected insect and plant specimens for identification. 

Job Description
The internship will involve both field and laboratory work. Field work may last all day and involve physical activities such as walking to field sites while carrying up to 25 pounds of equipment, collecting bees and other insects using nets and other trapping techniques, and sampling plants. It is anticipated that 30-70% of the intern’s time will be spent in the field and the remaining time in the laboratory. Laboratory work will consist of preparing insect specimens for identification (e.g., washing, drying, pinning, and labeling specimens), organizing insect collections, cataloging plant specimens, and entering data into Excel workbooks.

 

Nutrient management for new potato varieties

Faculty Mentor: Ruijun Qin
BES site:  Hermiston Agricultural Research & Extension Center 
Hourly Salary: $12   
Expected hours/week: 25-40 hours/week
Duration needed: Summer and/or Fall 2017
No Housing Benefit
Student will have access to hazardous chemicals and will need to complete a criminal background check.

The Columbia River Basin region of Oregon plays a critical role in potato productions in the US. The potato varieties (e.g., Russet Burbank, Norkotah, Shepody, Red Pontiac, and Ranger Russet) are broadly grown in the region for decades. Over recent years, new varieties are being released in the region which shows great potential in production and/or disease tolerant, etc. However, the nutrient management plan for the new varieties is still based on growers’ standard for the traditional varieties. There is a need to study the nutrient requirement for the new varieties and correspondingly to update the nutreint management plan in order to achieve the promising crop production and quality while to improve nitrogen use efficacy. Through lab studies and field trials, our objectives are to 1) quantify the plant nutrition (mainly on N) for the new varieties, 2) evaluate the N availability of different soils, and 3) evaluate or update the N management plan for the new varieties in different soils. Research findings will be important for growers in the region towards improving crop production while reducing fertilization costs.

Job Description
This project will provide students experience in agricultural research through laboratory study, field trials, nutrient management, and crop management research. The student will have the chance to gain experience in the field agronomy programs at our irrigated research sites. The student intern will be expected to observe and collect data on crop growth, take soil and plant samples, measure yield and quality, and submit data/report to the PI.

Applicable majors include soil and crop science, general agronomy, and other agriculture related majors. Applicants should be motivated, hardworking, team-player, and physically able to work in field condictions.

Starting and ending dates will be determined on an individual's needs and project needs. The student intern will be expected to spend 20-25 hours per week for the project. Depending the availability, he/she may also have a chance to work for more research projects.