Fisheries and Wildlife

November 2012 Student of the Month: Andrew Futerman

Andrew Futerman

Andrew served his country for five years in the United States Army. He says he joined as a boy and left as a man. He learned that no matter the obstacles, there have always been worse things.

The Army gave him tools, experience and a model of self-discipline that is now carrying over into his educational pursuits. Skills he attained such as problem solving, thinking outside the box, punctuality, teamwork, compass, maps, GPS skills, and survival carry over into his academic work.

Andrew Futerman
College of Agricultural Sciences
Student of the Month
November 2012 – Service Learning

Andrew served his country for five years in the United States Army. He says he joined as a boy and left as a man. He learned that no matter the obstacles, there have always been worse things.

The Army gave him tools, experience and a model of self-discipline that is now carrying over into his educational pursuits. Skills he attained such as problem solving, thinking outside the box, punctuality, teamwork, compass, maps, GPS skills, and survival carry over into his academic work. He has succeeded in making good grades and being on the Dean’s List. Service learning continues in his volunteer work with the Chintimini Wildlife Rehabilitation Center where he is honing skills of animal care and husbandry, and being President of a non-profit men’s health and fitness organization, gaining people skills and focusing attention to detail.

Andrew is a Fish and Wildlife Biology major who, in his spare time, plays the drums and enjoys hiking, backpacking, camping, reading and cooking.

October 2011 Student of the Month: Mee-ya Monnin

Mee-Ya Monnin

Mee-ya is on a six month internship with Dr. Markus Horning of the Marine Mammal Institute, studying the thermoregulation of Weddell seals.  Four months of her internship was at the Hatfield Marine Science Center for preparation and calibration of equipment, followed by six weeks in Antarctica participating in field work.

Mee-ya Monnin
College of Agricultural Sciences
Student of the Month
October 2011 – Internships

Mee-ya is on a six month internship with Dr. Markus Horning of the Marine Mammal Institute, studying the thermoregulation of Weddell seals.  Four months of her internship was at the Hatfield Marine Science Center for preparation and calibration of equipment, followed by six weeks in Antarctica participating in field work.  She is reporting on her experience via her blog at http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/hailing frozen thoughts

Mee-ya is majoring in Fisheries and Wildlife Science, with an expected graduation date of 2013.

Animal nature

Publication Source: 
Oregonian

Give large, charismatic species such as African elephants protected corridors through which to move and other large mammals benefit, too, a new study led by an Oregon State University wildlife ecologist shows.

Give large, charismatic species such as African elephants protected corridors through which to move and other large mammals benefit, too, a new study led by an Oregon State University wildlife ecologist shows.

OSU scientist one of four honored as Pew Fellows in Marine Conservation

Publication Source: 
OSU Press
Scott

Scott Baker, an Oregon State University conservation geneticist and cetacean specialist whose work was featured in the Academy Award-winning documentary, “The Cove,” has been named one of four 2011 Pew Fellows in Marine Conservation.

Scott Baker, an Oregon State University conservation geneticist and cetacean specialist whose work was featured in the Academy Award-winning documentary, “The Cove,” has been named one of four 2011 Pew Fellows in Marine Conservation.

55-foot ‘sea monster’ washed up in China

Publication Source: 
Yahoo News

Upon seeing a photo of the carcass, three marine biology experts — Scott Baker of Oregon State University Marine Mammal Institute, Bill Perrin, senior scientist for marine mammals at the National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bob Brownell, senior scientist for international protected resources with the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration’s Fisheries Service — all think it’s a whale. (See also Discovery News, Daily Mail)

Upon seeing a photo of the carcass, three marine biology experts — Scott Baker of Oregon State University Marine Mammal Institute, Bill Perrin, senior scientist for marine mammals at the National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bob Brownell, senior scientist for international protected resources with the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration’s Fisheries Service — all think it’s a whale. (See also Discovery News, Daily Mail)

In Pacific’s fertile California current, marine predators bountiful

“It is the most in-depth undertaking of its type that’s ever been done anywhere, ever,” says Bruce Mate, director of the Marine Mammal Institute at Oregon State University, who followed the whales as part of the study.

“It is the most in-depth undertaking of its type that’s ever been done anywhere, ever,” says Bruce Mate, director of the Marine Mammal Institute at Oregon State University, who followed the whales as part of the study.

So many elk eating, trampling grass on Zumwalt Prairie that hazers hired to run them off

Publication Source: 
Oregon Live

Rocky Mountain elk began showing up on the Zumwalt in the 1970s after being introduced into eastern Oregon's Blue Mountains in the 1930s. Records suggest they were rare to non-existent in the region during the frontier era.

Rocky Mountain elk began showing up on the Zumwalt in the 1970s after being introduced into eastern Oregon's Blue Mountains in the 1930s. Records suggest they were rare to non-existent in the region during the frontier era.

High number of barred owls in PNW forests

Publication Source: 
USGS
barred owl

David Wiens was an Oregon State University doctoral student during this study. The USGS has been the leader and major sponsor of this and a related 4-year research project in western Oregon to investigate competitive interactions between spotted owls and barred owls.

David Wiens was an Oregon State University doctoral student during this study. The USGS has been the leader and major sponsor of this and a related 4-year research project in western Oregon to investigate competitive interactions between spotted owls and barred owls.

Science Pub tackles invasive species

At the May 9 edition of Corvallis Science Pub, Oregon State University’s Sam Chan will describe how the state gears up for invasive species – and the surprising new places from which these nonnatives originate.

At the May 9 edition of Corvallis Science Pub, Oregon State University’s Sam Chan will describe how the state gears up for invasive species – and the surprising new places from which these nonnatives originate.

Bird sightings: Caspian tern

Publication Source: 
Salt Lake Tribune

Yasuko Suzuki, a member of the Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University, confirmed that the tern photographed by Young had been banded as a chick in June 2005 at Crescent Island in the Columbia River near Pasco, Wash.

Yasuko Suzuki, a member of the Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University, confirmed that the tern photographed by Young had been banded as a chick in June 2005 at Crescent Island in the Columbia River near Pasco, Wash.