Title Summary Due Date
NIH -
Predictive Multiscale Models for Biomedical, Biological, Behavioral, Environmental and Clinical Research (U01)
PAR-15-085
Full announcement

Letter of Intent due 04/29/2017.  Full Proposal due 05/29/2017. The goal of this interagency funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to support the development of multiscale models to accelerate biological, biomedical, behavioral, environmental and clinical research. The NIH, ARO, DOE, FDA, NASA, NSF, and ONR recognize that in order to efficiently and effectively address the challenges of understanding multiscale biological and behavioral systems, researchers will need predictive, computational models that encompass multiple biological and behavioral scales.  This FOA supports the development of non-standard modeling methods and experimental approaches to facilitate multiscale modeling, and active participation in community-driven activities through the Multiscale Modeling (MSM) Consortium, www.imagwiki.org.

Letter of Intent due 02/15/2015.  Full Proposal due 03/17/2015.
This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits grant applications proposing exploratory research focused on the inception and early-stage development of highly innovative molecular or cellular analysis technologies for basic and clinical cancer research. The emphasis of this FOA is on supporting the development of novel molecular and cellular analysis capabilities with a high degree of technical innovation with the potential to significantly affect and transform investigations exploring the molecular and cellular basis of cancer. If successful, these technologies should accelerate and/or enhance research in the areas of cancer biology, early detection and screening, clinical diagnosis, treatment, epidemiology, and/or cancer health disparities. Technologies proposed for development may be intended to have widespread applicability but must be based on molecular and/or cellular characterizations of cancer. This funding opportunity is part of a broader NCI-sponsored Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies (IMAT) Program.
April 29, 2017
Great Lakes Protection Fund -
Great Lakes Protection Fund
N/A
Full announcement

Letter of intent (full proposal by invitation).  The Great Lakes Protection Fund welcomes ideas for projects that will create and advance the next generation of actions to protect and restore the ecological health of the Great Lakes. Our support is a little different than that of most funders. Our mission is big, our niche is relatively narrow, and the improvements we seek will have regional implications.  We do not have specific funding programs, nor do we have formal deadlines. We are always open to discussing ideas and we can be nimble (e.g., funding vehicles, timeframes) when an opportunity presents itself.  Think of us as an investor more than a charity. Many, but not all, of the investments we make are called grants, but they more closely resemble seed capital or angel investments. We will work with you to align your innovation with the funding instrument that will help your idea make a big difference. The Fund accepts sizable risks in the quest for outsized ecological reward.

April 30, 2017
FDA - CVM -
NARMS Cooperative Agreement Program to Enhance and Strengthen Antibiotic Resistance Surveillance in Retail Food Specimens (U01)
PAR-16-099
Full announcement

Full proposal (letter of intent due 3/2/2017).  This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM), builds upon the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) which was initiated in 1996 as one of the key activities in a national action plan to combat antibiotic resistance threats. The purpose of this FOA is to protect and promote public health by enhancing, strengthening and sustaining antibiotic resistance surveillance in retail food specimens within the NARMS program. The NARMS cooperative agreements will improve the detection of antibiotic resistance among enteric bacteria in food commodities, as well as potentially develop new sites as part of the program. Measurable outcomes of the program will be in alignment with the NARMS Objectives.

May 1, 2017
FDA - HHS -
Vet-LIRN Cooperative Agreement Program to Develop and Validate Testing Methods for Food Irradiation Specific Markers in Animal Feeds and Treats (U18)
PAR-16-132
Full announcement

FULL PROPOSAL (Pre-proposal due 3/2/2017).  Food irradiation is a food preservation method which is used in many countries, both in human and animal food manufacturing. Treating food with irradiation results in large reduction in microbial contamination and insect pests. It is also useful in slowing ripening of fruit and for inhibiting sprouting of plant products. In USA, the FDA regulates all aspects of irradiation, such as irradiation dose, product type, and labeling requirements. The use of irradiation requires development of analytical methods capable to determine the irradiation status of wide variety of foods, in order to ensure that food is properly labeled, as well as to insure that products were properly handled during irradiation process. Current FDA regulations allow a maximum absorbed dose of 50 kGy in animal feed, pet food, and treats that are irradiated to reduce microbial and insect pest contamination. There are however, very few tests, with limited application, to quantify the actual dose used when irradiating animal food products. Depending on the type of food, various methods are available to detect food irradiation. For fatty foods, the major methods are based on chemical determination of compounds formed from the irradiation of lipids (hydrocarbons and 2-alkylcyclobutanones). It is believed that 2-alkylcyclobutanones (2-ACBs) are formed in food only by irradiation, and they are considered as markers for detecting the irradiation in food. Electron spin resonance (ESP) spectroscopy detects irradiation induced paramagnetic centers (e.g. radicals). This method is applicable for detection of irradiated foods containing bone, cellulose or crystalline sugar. Thermoluminescence is a method applicable to those foods from which a sufficient amount of silicate minerals can be isolated. Photostimulated luminescence is a different method, which can be applied to detect irradiation of any food which contains mineral debris. DNA comet assay can be used to detect irradiation of any food containing DNA, with several limitations. Different microbiological methods are also available, but can only be used as a screening tool.The current funding opportunity is designed to develop analytical methods for detection and quantification of markers such as 2-ACB's in animal feeds and treats to help the FDA to determine and regulate the dose of irradiation that was used during production. Eligibility is limited to domestic (U.S) applicants.

May 1, 2017
Bullitt Foundation -
Bullitt Foundation Regional Ecosystems Health
N/A
Full announcement

Full proposal (inquiry deadline 3/15/2017).  The Regional Ecosystem Health program recognizes that human well-being is dependent on the ecosystem goods and services that nature provides. It addresses issues at the interface of the built environment and the natural world and illuminates the links between healthy ecosystems, open space, working lands, and vibrant human communities. It seeks to advance innovations in regional planning and management of land and water to improve cross-sector coordination and ensure that policy and financial decisions fully account for the value we receive from nature. And, it supports efforts, based on sound science, to restore and protect nature as the basic infrastructure supporting urban resilience and sustainability.
Ecosystem goods and services include more than the raw materials on which our economies and communities are built. They also include the fundamental life support services provided “for free” by nature: purification of air, regulation of water flows, detoxification and decomposition of wastes, regeneration of soil fertility, pollination of food crops, and production and maintenance of biodiversity.

May 1, 2017
Bullitt Foundation -
Bullitt Foundation Energy, Climate, and Materials
N/A
Full announcement

Full proposal (letter of inquiry was due 3/15/2017).  Energy, materials, labor, creativity, and other “factors of production” often can be easily substituted for one another. Insulation can be substituted for natural gas. Sophisticated daylighting can be substituted for electric lights. Electrified transit can be substituted for gasoline. Such choices, when aggregated over time, create the difference between prosperous communities that run on clean energy instead of bleak, inefficient wastelands burdened by toxic pollution.
With more of the world’s population concentrating in dense urban environments, the Energy, Climate & Materials program promotes livable cities conducive to human well-being. A fundamental goal of the Energy, Climate & Materials program is to eliminate the externalized costs that dirty energy and toxic chemicals impose on the natural environment and human health. By reducing the use of fossil fuels it will reduce emissions that cause climate change. By transitioning from toxic materials to inherently safe ones, it will encourage economic growth through technological advancements in materials & chemistry based on sound ecological values.

May 1, 2017
Bullitt Foundation -
Bullitt Foundation: Deep Green Buildings
N/A
Full announcement

Full proposal (pre-proposal due 3/15/2017).  Using the Bullitt Center as a touchstone, the Deep Green Buildings program promotes huge leaps—as opposed to incremental shifts—in the built environment. It promotes the construction of commercial and residential buildings that implement designs, materials, and technologies that are most relevant to 21st century needs and conditions, including the impending changes to our region’s climate. Deep Green Buildings emphasizes actual building performance instead of installed measures or attribute checklists. It encourages the development of structures with very long design lives and inherent flexibility to adjust to an uncertain future. It seeks to create broad industry and consumer acceptance of buildings that operate as components in a larger, ecologically resilient and sustainable neighborhood system; are comfortable, productive, healthy, and beautiful; and display the lightest possible environmental footprint. Ultimately, the program works to ensure that the Bullitt Center is the first of many buildings of its kind.

May 1, 2017
NEA -
ART WORKS Guidelines: Creativity Connects Projects
2017NEA01AWCC
Full announcement

Art Works: Creativity Connects grants require a partnership between an arts program and a non-arts organization. The Arts Endowment's support of a project may start on or after June 1, 2018. Generally, a period of performance of up to two years is allowed. An organization that submits an application to Art Works: Creativity Connects is still eligible to submit an application to other National Endowment for the Arts funding opportunities. In each case, the request must be for a distinctly different project or a distinctly different phase of the same project, with a different period of performance and costs. An organization may submit only one application for an Art Works: Creativity Connects grant. Program Description Creativity Connects* is an initiative that shows how the arts contribute to the nation’s creative ecosystem, investigates how support systems for the arts are changing, explores how the arts can connect with other sectors that want and utilize creativity, and invests in innovative projects to spark new, collaborative ideas. A key component of Creativity Connects is a grant opportunity in the Art Works category that supports collaborative, mutually beneficial partnerships between the arts and non-arts sectors, specifically: • Agriculture • Business and Economic Development • Science • Technology • Healthcare • Community • Education • Environment • Military • Transportation Art Works: Creativity Connects projects mutually benefit both the arts and non-arts sectors by: • Demonstrating the beneficial contributions of artists and creative work to societal health. • Supporting the infrastructure for the arts to work in new ways with new sectors. • Building bridges that create new relationships and constituencies. • Creating innovative partnership projects to advance common goals.

May 4, 2017
NIH -
Systems Science and Health in the Behavioral and Social Sciences (R01)
PAR-15-048
Full announcement

Letter of Intent Deadline. This FOA is intended to increase the breadth and scope of topics that can be addressed with systems science methodologies. This FOA calls for research projects that are applied and/or basic in nature (including methodological and measurement development), have a human behavioral and/or social science focus, and employ methodologies suited to addressing the complexity inherent in behavioral and social phenomena, referred to as systems science methodologies. Additionally, this FOA seeks to promote interdisciplinary collaboration among health researchers and experts in computational approaches to further the development of modeling- and simulation-based systems science methodologies and their application to important public health challenges.

May 6, 2017
USDA-NIFA -
Crop Protection and Pest Management
USDA-NIFA-CPPM-006264
Full announcement

The purpose of the Crop Protection and Pest Management program is to address high priority issues related to pests and their management using IPM approaches at the state, regional and national levels. The CPPM program supports projects that will ensure food security and respond effectively to other major societal pest management challenges with comprehensive IPM approaches that are economically viable, ecologically prudent, and safe for human health. The CPPM program addresses IPM challenges for emerging issues and existing priority pest concerns that can be addressed more effectively with new and emerging technologies. The outcomes of the CPPM program are effective, affordable, and environmentally sound IPM practices and strategies needed to maintain agricultural productivity and healthy communities.

May 9, 2017

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