Oryzalin-induced Tetraploidy in Crytomeria japonica (Cupressaceae)

Breeding

Japanese-cedar (Crytomeria japonica) performs well under a range of soil and environmental conditions but has been underused in landscapes, in part, due to winter browning. In previous studies, chance seedlings that did not exhibit winter browning were identified as tetraploids. This study was conducted to induce polyploidy in Crytomeria japonica.

Sulfuric Acid Scarification of Callicarpa americana L. (Lamiaceae) Seeds Improves Germination

Propagation

An experiment was performed to determine a more effective protocol for germinating C. americana seeds. It was hypothesized that scarification with sulfuric acid would aid in breaking seedcoat dormancy, thereby resulting in more rapid and uniform germination.

Reducing Phytophthora

Plant Disease

Phytophthora species are some of the most problematic plant pathogens in nursery production systems. The Oregon State University affiliated author provides these top 10 tips which will help prevent this group of pathogens from taking hold.

The Effects of Methyl Bromide Alternatives on Soil and Seedling Pathogen Populations, Weeds, and Seedling Morphology in Oregon and Washington Forest Nurseries

Disease
Fumigation treatments (a conventional methyl bromide – chloropicrin application and reduced-rate alternative fumigant treatments) and a nonfumigated treatment were evaluated at forest nurseries in Oregon and Washington for their effects on soil pathogen populations, weeds, and seedling morphology.

Influence of Isolation Method on Recovery of Pythium Species From Forest Nursery Soils in Oregon and Washington

Disease
In an attempt to identify Pythium species (common dampening off pathogens) associated with forest nursery soils, field surveys were conducted at three forest nurseries (two in Oregon and one in Washington) in 2008 using three isolation methods.

Susceptibility of the Strawberry Crown Moth (Lepedoptera: Sesiidae) to Entomopathogenic Nematodes

Insects
The purpose of this research was to determine the susceptibility of the strawberry crown moth, Synanthedon bibionipennis (Boisduval) (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) larvae to two species of entomopathogenic nematodes. The entomopathogenic nematodes Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) strain Agriotos and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (Steiner) strain Oswego were evaluated in laboratory soil bioassays and the field.

Impact of Fungicides on Metarhizium anisopliae in the Rhizosphere, Bulk Soil and In Vitro

Insects
These studies were conducted to determine the compatibility of M. anisopliae (F52) with a wide range of fungicides commonly applied to container-grown ornamentals for the management of soil-borne plant pathogens. In addition, the impact of fungicide application to M. anisopliae population in soilless potting media (bulk and rhizosphere soil) was also determined.

Diversity of Rhizosphere Associated Entomopathogenic Fungi of Perennial Herbs, Shrubs and Coniferous Trees

Insects
This study sought to ascertain if there was an association between host plant and species of fungi by using phylogenetic analysis to determine the prevalence of Metarhizium and Beauveria spp. isolated from the rhizosphere of strawberry, blueberry, grape and Christmas tree crops in the Willamette Valley of Oregon.

Effects of Irrigation Frequency and Nitrogen Fertilizer Rate on Water Stress, Nitrogen Uptake, and Plant Growth of Container-grown Rhododendron

Nursery Crops

The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of water stress (as induced by irrigation frequency) on growth and nitrogen (N) uptake of one deciduous and two evergreen cultivars of Rhododendron grown with different rates of N fertilizer in containers.

Nutrient Uptake and Loss by Container-grown Deciduous and Evergreen Rhododendron Nursery Plants

Nursery Crops
The objectives of the study were to determine whether N availability alters 1) the uptake of other nutrients; 2) allocation of other nutrients among different plant structures; 3) ratios of N uptake to uptake of other nutrients (N uptake ratios); and 4) nutrient losses during the fall and winter.

Pages