Obscure Root Weevil

Obscure root weevil, Sciopithes obscurus Horn, most commonly found in landscapes, is becoming a more prominent weevil in nursery production in some sites in the Pacific Northwest. The behavior of this weevil tends to vary from other root weevils such as black vine root weevil. The adult sometimes remains in the foliage rather than climbing down the plant trunk to hide during the day. This weevil lays its eggs inside a folded edge of the leaf. Females can lay eight eggs/day, roughly equivalent to a black vine weevil, and the average cumulative production was just under 100 eggs/weevil in a lab study conducted by Tanigoshi et al. in 1999.

A wonderful resource to identify many common root weevils is available online at WSU's website and called Western Washington Field Guide to Common Small Fruit Root Weevils.

 

Page last modified 4/19/07

Obscure root weevil eggs in leaf fold

Obscure root weevil eggs in leaf fold
Photo: Ken Gray

Obscure root weevil adult. Photo: Jennifer Boyd

Obscure root weevil adult.
Photo: Jennifer Boyd

3 Obscure Root Weevils

3 Obscure Root Weevils