Crop Pest Losses Impact Assessments

The Crop Pest Losses Impact Assessment (CPLIA) is a recurring, industry-specific survey administered to growers and crop consultants that collects data on seasonal pest pressure, production costs, and the adoption and impact of new technologies. These surveys can provide evidence to support the adoption of IPM strategies, or reveal specific areas in need of improvement or rethinking. 

Critical information for the future of IPM

Regular evaluation of pest pressure, pesticide use, costs, and yield and quality losses due to pests are our most objective tools for assessing IPM status and general progress in agriculture. Oregon State University’s Crop Pest Losses Impact Assessment program (a collaboration between Oregon State University’s Oregon IPM Center, the University of Arizona’s Arizona Pest Management Center, the Western IPM Center, and industry partners) is a survey process that tracks pest impact trends and pesticide use over time, and can focus industry-wide discussions about IPM needs. This information can ultimately be used to develop powerful impact statements for targeted IPM extension programs. These data are also valuable in priority setting and education, and for informing federal decision-making, including the US Environmental Protection Agency’s pesticide registration and review process.
 

A proven track record

The Crop Pest Losses Impact Assessment survey process was developed by our colleagues at the Arizona Pest Management Center, and is a current signature program of the Western IPM Center. In collaboration with colleagues at the Arizona Pest Management Center, the Oregon IPM Center is now building a Crop Pest Losses Impact Assessment program for Pacific Northwest Commodities including, onion, cranberry, hazelnut, mint, and brassica crops. This dovetails with our IPM Strategic Planning project and takes place on a regular cycle with participating industries.

Assessment Surveys

  
 

Crop pest loss assessments are not your normal survey: these are intensive workshops designed to capture detailed crop loss, pesticide application, and economic impact information in order to gain a better understanding of how pests and pest management strategies affect crop loss. Surveys are completed during scheduled workshops attended by crop consultants, university research and extension faculty, and growers that represent participating industries. For example, respondents are asked to estimate price per unit of crop, crop yields, losses due to specific pests, pest-by-pest information on acres infested, and costs of control. Each survey is intended to inform participants about current pest management successes and needs, and it is also intended to be part of a sequence of annual surveys that can reveal trends and responses to change over time.  
 

 

 

 


    

"Quantifiable measurements of pest pressure, pesticide use, costs, and yield and quality losses due to pests are our most objective tools for assessing IPM status, and general progress in agriculture. This information is also valuable in supporting IPM evaluation and needs assessment, in priority setting and education, and for informing federal decision-making."
 

Recent Activities

  • New! March 2021Measuring the Economic Impact of Pests and Pest Management on Oregon PeppermintThis summary demonstrates the yield and economic impacts of pests and pest management practices on the 2018 crop of Oregon peppermint. Researchers, Extension workers and crop consultants will benefit from this graphical look at real-world data on the impacts of pests on a key Northwest crop.

  • February 2019: Treasure Valley dry bulb onion Pest Losses Workshop, Ontario, OR. Six participants from the Treasure Valley completed surveys, representing over 7,600 acres, or 38%, of Treasure Valley dry bulb onion acreage.

  • January 2019: Peppermint Pest Losses Workshop, Gleneden Beach, OR. Twelve attendees from Oregon, including three research and extension faculty from OSU to learn the process. Nine participants completed surveys, representing over 4,500 acres, or 17%, of mint production acreage Oregon.

  • June 2018: Hazelnut Pest Losses Workshop, Salem, OR. Nine attendees from Oregon, including two research and extension faculty from OSU to learn the process. Six participants completed surveys, representing over 17,000 acres of hazelnut production across Oregon. 

  • March 2018: Cherry Pest Losses Workshop, Hood River, OR. Nine attendees from Oregon and Washington. Seven participants completed surveys, representing significant cherry acreage across Oregon and Washington. 

  • March 2017: Cranberry Pest Losses Workshop, Bandon, OR. Ten participants, including OSU Extension faculty interested in learning the methodology. Eight participants completed surveys, representing over 3,000 acres across Oregon and Washington. 

  • December 2016: Potato Pest Losses Workshop, Hermiston, OR. Seventeen participants, including extension faculty from other areas. Eight participants completed surveys, representing 46,785 potato acres across Oregon and Washington. 

  • November 2016: Onion Pest Losses Workshop, Ontario, OR. Seventeen attendees from Oregon and Idaho, including six research and extension faculty from OSU and University of Idaho to learn the process. Ten partcipants completed surveys, representeing 4,044 acres of onion production across the Treasure Valley. 

Pest Impact Reports

   

Published Reports

 

Crop Pest Loss Impact Assessment reports contain an abundance of pest management data. For some examples of completed reports, please see the publications by the Arizona Pest Management Center.

This graph, adapted from a report on IPM in Cotton by Peter Ellsworth, shows a reduction in sprays per year for multiple pests. 

 

Oregon Pest impact reports for participating crop systems are currently being produced and are expected to be available in 2021. For more information, contact Isaac Sandlin.