Volume X - Issue 4

From the Dean

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Sincerely,
Alan

Alan Sams
Reub Long Professor and Dean
College of Agricultural Sciences
Director
Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station

Recent News

Oregeon State University Gets $1 Million to Study Hemp

The Global Hemp Innovation Center at Oregon State University has received a $1 million gift to explore hemp genomics, research that can grow understanding of how hemp may be used in health and nutrition products, textiles and construction materials.

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Oregon's Agricultural Progress Magazine

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OSU Update

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Our Best

OSU research assistant participates in Bayer Women in Golf event

In 2016, Emily Braithwaite competed for Rutgers University at the Collegiate Turf Bowl, an annual event sponsored by the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA). At Turf Bowl, competitors identify diseases and insects and calculate application rates of chemicals and fertilizers, among other things.

Braithwaite and her teammates were all women. When they got to Turf Bowl, they realized they were the only all-female team. That’s when Braithwaite realized that something needed to change in the male-dominated world of turf management.

“We need to do more to promote turf management careers to women,” said Braithwaite, now a faculty research assistant in Oregon State University’s Turf Management Program. In 2016, women represented about 0.5% of the GCSAA membership – 102 out of 17,500...

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Global Experiences

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Students

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New Fields

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Research

Oregon State University’s Global Hemp Innovation Center receives $1M for genetics research

Oregon State University’s Global Hemp Innovation Center has received a $1 million gift to explore hemp genomics, research that can grow understanding of how hemp may be used in health and nutrition products, textiles and construction materials.

The gift to the OSU Foundation was provided by Oregon CBD, a hemp seed research and development company.

The Global Hemp Innovation Center was launched in June by OSU’s College of Agricultural Sciences and is the largest, most comprehensive hemp research center in the nation. Led by Jay Noller, the center is based in the College of Agricultural Sciences, with faculty from multiple disciplines and colleges across OSU, and has a global reach that includes partnerships in four countries.

Oregon State University gets $1 million to study hemp (KATU)
OSU Hemp Research Receives $1M Donation (YouTube)

NWREC dinner continues to grow

The September 20 event beought together 300 local farmers, ag leaders and other guests a the Aurora research facility..

This dinner is an annual showcase of research and education work done at NWREC — Oregon State University's only experimental farm in the Willamette Valley — during the past year and shared through a farm-to-plate dinner. Many of the fruits and vegetables making up the meal came from the Research Center's experimental trials during the past summer.

Other menu items included innovative food products developed by faculty and students at OSU's Corvallis campus and other research locations around the state. Besides the popular OSU cheeses created by OSU students, surimi noodles — a product looking like a pasta noodle, but made entirely from fish — and a seaweed product, called dulse, were featured this year. Both surimi noodles and dulse were developed by OSU at their Food Innovation Center in north Portland.

Think Too Much: Researcher at OSU probes cat-human link (Gazette Times)

Kristyn Vitale is a woman on a mission: She's out to dispel at least part of the bad rap about cats — that they're aloof and independent, that they only care about their humans because we feed them and so forth. Any cat person who's gotten into a debate with a dog person knows all about that drill.

Vitale, a researcher in the Human-Animal Interaction Lab in Oregon State University's College of Agricultural Sciences, is working to disprove that bad rap, one study at a time. Last week, her latest study, showing that pet cats form attachments to their human owners that are similar to the bond formed by children and dogs, earned attention from major media, including The New York Times and The Oregonian. The media spotlight, Vitale said, has been "very overwhelming, but in a good way."

Cats, like children and dogs, develop attachments to their caregivers, study shows (EurekaAlert!)

Underwater soundscapes reveal differences in marine environments

Storms, boat traffic, animal noises and more contribute to the underwater sound environment in the ocean, even in areas considered protected, a new study from Oregon State University shows.

Using underwater acoustic monitors, researchers listened in on Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of Boston; Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in Alaska; National Park of American Samoa; and Buck Island Reef National Monument in the Virgin Islands.

They found that the ambient sounds varied widely across the sites and were driven by differences in animal vocalization rates, human activity and weather.

Combine solar and agricultural farming to meet energy demand

Many crops can thrive just as well, if not better, under solar panels. Realizing this has led scientists to look into how to combine solar and agricultural farming. Now, a new study concludes that installing solar panels on less than 1% of agricultural farmland could satisfy the world’s demand for electrical energy.

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Art About Agriculture

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Reaching Out

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Alumni & Friends

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In Memoriam

Roy Arnold

Dr. Roy Arnold – former OSU provost and executive vice president, and former dean of our College of Agricultural Sciences – passed away Sunday, September 22, 2019 following a battle with pancreatic cancer.

Roy was a consistently gracious colleague and a friend to many. Throughout his career in higher education at Oregon State University and at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Roy was a committed educator of people who were inspired by what was possible in agriculture nationally and throughout the world. As a university administrator at Nebraska and at OSU, he was a leader, problem solver and a person who never was afraid of a challenge.

Roy earned his master’s and doctorate degrees from Oregon State, having earned his bachelor’s degree from Nebraska. After 20 years working at Nebraska in varied positions, he was named dean of OSU’s College of Agricultural Sciences in 1987 and then provost and executive vice President in 1991. During his tenure as provost, Roy helped OSU navigate significant budget reductions prompted by voters’ adoption of property tax limitations that resulted in reduced state support for higher education.

While provost, Roy helped launch OSU’s Honors College, Ethnic Studies Department, and the university’s dual admissions and enrollment programs with Oregon’s many community colleges. In 2000, Roy returned to the College of Agricultural Sciences as executive associate dean, and later helped lead OSU-Cascades in Bend for a time.

Over the past five years, Roy was instrumental in helping to plan OSU150 – the celebration of Oregon State University’s 150th anniversary. Roy made sure that OSU150 not only celebrated the past, but provided a spotlight on OSU’s contributions as one of the nation’s only two land, space, sea and sun grant universities. And he emphasized that OSU150 also imagined what the university might become in its next 150 years.

For more about Roy’s life and meaningful contributions while at OSU, please visit his oral history recollections that were recorded as part of more than 200 oral history interviews conducted during OSU150.

Roy is survived by his wife, Jane, his daughters, Jana Hoffman of Portland and Julie Salvi of Olympia, WA. and two grandchildren.

Respected former provost Roy Arnold passes away (Daily Barometer)

Obituary (Gazette Times)

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