tion research is taught to students both in the classroom and in the field and shared with research colleagues and stakeholders through a variety of channels, including publishing in print and on the Web. That knowledge is also brought to the community through OSU Extension Service’s outreach and engagement, and input from the community and other stakeholders are fed back to our researchers. The Statewide Public Service programs (OAES and Extension, along with the Forestry Research Laboratory) are the engines helping to rebuild Oregon’s economy.

Money for Station research comes from several sources. The state general fund provides less than 30 percent of the Station’s annual funding. Over 55 percent comes from research grants and contracts from federal and state agencies, private sources and foundations. Other funds come from product sales and service fees.

Branch Experiment Stations

Station directors, headquartered on the OSU campus, coordinate the efforts of scientists based at branch stations and research and extension centers across the state. These far flung branch stations and centers are located in the different soil and climate regimes around the state in order to provide producers with information geared to different growing conditions.

Research Areas

The Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station (OAES) targets research programs critical to CAS, the West and Oregon, as well as those that address the six challenge areas defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA). 

NIFA Challenge Areas

  • Plant Health and Production and Plant Products;

  • Animal Health and Production and Animal Products;

  • Food Safety, Nutrition, and Health;

  • Renewable Energy, Natural Resources, and Environment;

  • Agriculture Systems and Technology; and

  • Agriculture Economics and Rural Communities.